Frequently Asked Questions

The Ulster County Resource Recovery Agency has educational resources available including publications, books and videos on recycling, composting, waste reduction and general environmental topics.

Call us at (845) 336-0600 or click here to contact us through our email form for a complete listing of available materials.

Click on a question below to see the answer.
The Ulster County Resource Recovery Agency operates two regional waste transfer stations. Click here for hours, locations and accepted materials.
Residents from any county may use either of the Agency’s transfer stations for trash disposal, with no permit required. Recycling is accepted from businesses ONLY.

Passenger vehicles (cars), such as four door sedans, hatchbacks, station wagons, sports cars, etc. are not able to utilize the facilities during the week due to the high volume of commercial truck traffic. However, that type of vehicle may use either transfer station on Saturdays.

Residents or businesses in vans, large SUVs, pick ups, dump trucks, trucks and trailers can use either transfer station (UTS or New Paltz) Monday thru Saturday.

Click here to view our price guide.

Please note: All open loads must be tarped.

There are two types of recycling: Single Stream (meaning everyting in one bin) and Dual Stream (separate bins for different materials).

UCRRA provides printable Dual Stream Recycling instructions for Ulster County: click here to view.

If you have Single Stream Recycling (everything in one bin), contact your hauler or town transfer station directly to find out what you can recycle.

Recycling in most of Ulster County is picked up by the trash/recycling hauler you select. For questions about your pickup day, a missed pickup, or materials collected at the curb; contact your trash hauler. For questions on all recyclable items, how to sort your recyclables, or where to drop off your recyclables, call the Ulster County Resource Recovery Agency Recycling Hotline at (845) 336-3336 and leave a message. The Recycling Coordinator will respond to you during our normal business hours. Collected recyclables are processed for sorting at the Ulster County Resource Recovery Agency located at 999 Flatbush Road, Kingston, New York. You can find a list of haulers here.
The Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), is a complex of sorting mechanisms that separate the recyclables by material. Too much time spent handpicking contaminants out of the material stream or unclogging machinery increases our expenses and decreases our ability to effectively separate valuable materials and increase operating performance. It is important to remember that your recycled materials will be used to make new products. Quality matters and the better you do following the guidelines, the better and more efficient the sorting process will be.
EVERYONE! The Ulster County Mandatory Source Separation and Recycling Law was passed in December 1991. It applies to every business, every household, every institution, every school and every government agency.
Glass is re-manufactured into new bottles and other glassware items, like casserole dishes. Paper goes to paper mills to become new paper; there is a great demand at paper mills for recycled fiber to make all grades of new paper from cardboard boxes to fine writing paper.
Aluminum is always a valuable material. Most aluminum cans contain recycled aluminum because it is much more energy and resource efficient for the industry to use reclaimed aluminum. A recycled aluminum can will end up back on the store shelf within six weeks after being recycled. Other metals, such as steel cans or scrap metals, have always had steady markets as well. Almost all metal products in the United States now have recycled content in them.
The plastic fibers from milk jugs and soda bottles are used in a range of applications including carpet, clothing, auto parts, tennis balls, park benches and sometimes even new bottles and jugs. All of our plastic markets are currently domestic.
Paint cans that are empty or have dried up paint in them may be thrown in the trash with the tops off. If you have latex paint, UCRRA recommends that you open up the paint can, completely dry it out, leave the top off and dispose with your regular trash. Kitty litter or paint hardening crystals (available in most paint and hardware stores) can be used to speed up the drying out process. Oil based paint, paint thinner, and stains can be dropped off at one of the Household Hazardous Waste and Pharmaceutical Waste Events held multiple times a year.
Regardless of where you bought it, what brand it is, or how old it is: bring it to us. We’ll make sure it’s properly and safely recycled. Businesses (less than 50 employees), non-profits (less than 75 employees) and residents can now recycle their e-waste at the Agency for FREE during business hours Monday through Friday 8am to 3pm. Call the Recycling Hotline (845) 336-3336 for more details. Please contact your local town transfer station directly for more info. Retail locations, such as Best Buy, Staples also have a recycling program for electronics. Please call the store for details. For more information on this program, click here.
Lightweight “peanuts” made from expanded polystyrene (EPS) contain 25 to 100 percent recycled materials. The Plastic Loose Fill Council has a “Peanut Hotline” (800-828-2214) you can call to find local recycling centers. The Town of Hurley Recycling Center also collects clean packaging peanuts for recycling; (845) 338-5412. To recycle large, molded chunks of EPS used to cushion televisions, air conditioners and such, contact the Alliance of Foam Packaging Recyclers.
UCRRA  as a matter of practice does not accept tires at either Transfer Station (New Paltz or Kingston). Please contact your local Town Transfer station to see if they accept tires.  Some local garages may take tires (small amount) for a fee.  For large loads of tires, you can contact Casings Tire Recycling at (518) 943-9404 – located in Catskill, NY.
You likely have two reasons for disposing of a fire extinguisher: it is too old or the contents have been discharged. Disposal options depend on whether or not the extinguisher is empty. The two most common types include dry chemical (sodium bicarbonate or mono-ammonium phosphate) and carbon dioxide (CO2) both of which are not hazardous.

***Dry Chemical Extinguishers: To safely dispose of dry chemical extinguishers, it is necessary to relieve the pressure, remove the head, and place it for recycling with ferrous metal.
When relieving the pressure (emptying the container) for disposal, review manufacturers’ instructions, or, if unavailable, use the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) PASS technique described below:
Pull the pin: this unlocks the operating lever and allows you to discharge the extinguisher. Some extinguishers may have other seals or tamper indicators.
Aim low: Point the extinguisher nozzle (or hose) at the base of the item.
Squeeze the lever above the handle: this discharges the extinguishing agent. Releasing the lever will stop the discharge. (Some extinguishers have a button instead of a lever.)
Sweep from side to side. After pressure has been relieved, (when nothing else comes out) remove the head from the fire extinguisher and place it for recycling with ferrous metal.
DO NOT place the fire extinguisher in your recycling bin without removing the head.
You can contact a local fire extinguisher retailer to request that they dispose of your extinguisher.

***Carbon Dioxide Extinguishers: Carbon dioxide extinguishers are refillable and should be refilled after each use. Contact a local fire extinguisher retailer to request that they refill or dispose of your extinguisher.
To safely dispose of carbon dioxide extinguishers, it is necessary to relieve the pressure, drill holes in the cylinder, and place it in your trash.
When relieving the pressure (emptying the container) for disposal, review manufacturers’ instructions, or, if unavailable, use the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) PASS technique described below:
Pull the pin: this unlocks the operating lever and allows you to discharge the extinguisher. Some extinguishers may have other seals or tamper indicators.
Aim low: Point the extinguisher nozzle (or hose) at the base of the item.

Squeeze the lever above the handle: this discharges the extinguishing agent. Releasing the lever will stop the discharge. (Some extinguishers have a button instead of a lever.)
Sweep from side to side. It is important to empty the contents, outside, away from children or pets because monoammonium phosphate (contained within) is an irritant to eyes and the respiratory tract. Wear goggles and a particulate mask when discharging the extinguisher.
In both cases, make sure to follow any instructions on the fire extinguisher. Once your old extinguisher is disposed, make sure you replace it with a new fire extinguisher immediately.

YES! The New York State’s Plastic Bag Reduction, Reuse and Recycling Act is a statewide law that requires certain retail and grocery stores to set up a plastic bag recycling program for customers to return plastic bags for recycling. The law went into effect on January 1, 2009. It has since been amended to allow the recycling of clean and dry plastic film in the same collection bins (ziploc bags, cereal bags, dry cleaning bags, etc.).

 

The eco-friendly answer is “neither”. Paper bags are not necessarily better for the environment than plastic -despite many consumers’ long-standing assumption that paper beats out plastic hands down when it comes to eco-friendliness. Environmental experts now say the best choice is neither paper nor plastic. The best choice is reusable shopping bags made of substance like cotton, hemp, nylon or durable mesh-like plastic. One thing is clear in every study that has been done: Reusable bags beat both paper and plastic on virtually all environmental criteria.